Patrick deWitt, Gabriel García Márquez, Jeremy Reed, Marijke Hanegraaf, Thomas Acda, Günter Kunert, Clark Accord, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Michelangelo

De Canadese schrijver en scenarist Patrick deWitt werd geboren op 6 maart 1975 op Vancouver Island. Zie ook alle tags voor Patrick deWitt op dit blog.

Uit: Ablutions

“You are sitting in the magical Ford outside the bar when Junior the crack addict walks up and steps into the car and you both sit there watching the building. His smell is otherworldly, like a demon from deep in the earth’s crust, and he repeatedly passes the fiercest gas; he has been too long without his drugs and his body is causing a fuss. He does not greet you and you do not greet him; a rift has grown between you recently, or rather a rift has grown between Junior and everyone—he is in the worst way and the doormen say he has been robbing people with his machete blade after hours. You are not afraid of him and you do not believe he would ever do you any harm but you wish he were somewhere other than sitting at your side, wondering about the contents of your pockets.
He is fidgeting with a lighter and finally he says to you, “I need twenty dollars, man. I need it bad.” When you tell him you haven’t got any money he punches your dashboard and pouts, asking himself how long this torture might go on. You tell him to wait a minute and you enter the empty bar, retrieving twenty dollars from the safe. You walk it out to him and he is relieved to see this money but wants to know where it came from. When you tell him you stole it he looks worried and asks if you won’t get into trouble, which is insulting because you know he does not actually care one way or the other. “Do your drugs or don’t do your drugs,” you say. “Don’t stand around sobbing and bitching about it.” He straightens himself up and nods and hustles off to find his dealer. All through the night you are bothered by guilt and self-loathing for speaking with him so harshly and angered that such a man could conjure these emotions in you.
Discuss your feeling of wonder when the pilfered twenty dollars is not reported missing at the end of the night. Discuss your routine of thieving that stems from this incident, and the criminal spree you quickly embark upon.
Your plan is to keep an at-home stolen-monies pile, separate from your life-monies pile, and to cultivate it to a respectable size and then, at some key point, utilize it dramatically. Within a month you have three hundred dollars and you feel great relief and satisfaction, as if justice has been served, and you wonder why you waited until this late date to begin stealing from the owner, who you (on a whim) decide is a bad man who expects you to gladly damage your mind and body with this potentially deadly work of washing dishes in a bar, and who has never asked you how your feelings were doing even though it is fairly obvious that they, your feelings, have been hurt and are still hurting yet.”

 
Patrick deWitt (Vancouver Island, 6 maart 1975)

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Patrick deWitt, Gabriel García Márquez, Jeremy Reed, Marijke Hanegraaf, Thomas Acda, Günter Kunert, Clark Accord, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Michelangelo”

Patrick deWitt, Gabriel García Márquez, Jeremy Reed, Marijke Hanegraaf, Thomas Acda, Günter Kunert, Clark Accord, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Michelangelo

De Canadese schrijver en scenarist Patrick deWitt werd geboren op 6 maart 1975 op Vancouver Island. Zie ook alle tags voor Patrick deWitt op dit blog.

Uit: Undermajordomo Minor

“These words played in Lucy’s head as he stood on the platform awaiting the Count and Countess’s arrival. As the train came into the station, he could hear a man’s wild cackling; when the Count emerged from his compartment he was quite obviously drunken, swaying in place, a cigar planted in the fold of his slick, blubbery mouth. His skull was a softly pink egg, his eyes blood-daubed yolks — he drew back from the sunlight as one scalded. Once recovered, he focused on Lucy, gripping him by the lapel. “Ah, Broom, happy to see you again, boy.”
“Yes, sir, nice to see you, as well. Only I’m not Mr Broom; my name is Lucy.”
“What?”
“My name is Lucy, sir.”
The Count stared. “You’re Broom.”
“I’m not he, sir.”
“Well, where has Broom run off to?”
“He has died, sir.”
The Count leaned back on his heels. Speaking over his shoulder and into the blackened compartment, he said, “Did you know about this?”
“About what?” said the Countess.
“Broom is dead.”
“Who?”
“The servant lad? Broom? You were so fond of him last time we visited.”
“Oh, yes, him. Nice boy — nice colouring. He’s dead, you say?”
“Dead as dinner, apparently.”
“How did he die?”
“I don’t know how.” The Count looked at Lucy. “How?”
Lucy said, “He was possessed by a wickedness and so cast himself into the Very Large Hole, sir.”
The Count made an irritable face.
“Did he say a very large hole?” the Countess asked.”

 
Patrick deWitt (Vancouver Island, 6 maart 1975)

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Patrick deWitt, Gabriel García Márquez, Jeremy Reed, Marijke Hanegraaf, Thomas Acda, Günter Kunert, Clark Accord, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Michelangelo”

Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Stéphane Hoffmann, Michelangelo, Teru Miyamoto, Nicolas Bouvier, Jan Kjærstad

De Engelse dichteres Elizabeth Barrett Browning werd op 6 maart 1806 geboren in Durham, Engeland. Zie ook alle tags voor Elizabeth Barrett Browning op dit blog.

A Dead Rose

O Rose! who dares to name thee?
No longer roseate now, nor soft, nor sweet;
But pale, and hard, and dry, as stubble-wheat,—
Kept seven years in a drawer—thy titles shame thee.

The breeze that used to blow thee
Between the hedgerow thorns, and take away
An odour up the lane to last all day,—
If breathing now,—unsweetened would forego thee.

The sun that used to smite thee,
And mix his glory in thy gorgeous urn,
Till beam appeared to bloom, and flower to burn,—
If shining now,—with not a hue would light thee.

The dew that used to wet thee,
And, white first, grow incarnadined, because
It lay upon thee where the crimson was,—
If dropping now,—would darken where it met thee.

The fly that lit upon thee,
To stretch the tendrils of its tiny feet,
Along thy leaf’s pure edges, after heat,—
If lighting now,—would coldly overrun thee.

The bee that once did suck thee,
And build thy perfumed ambers up his hive,
And swoon in thee for joy, till scarce alive,—
If passing now,—would blindly overlook thee.

The heart doth recognise thee,
Alone, alone! The heart doth smell thee sweet,
Doth view thee fair, doth judge thee most complete,—
Though seeing now those changes that disguise thee.

Yes, and the heart doth owe thee
More love, dead rose! than to such roses bold
As Julia wears at dances, smiling cold!—
Lie still upon this heart—which breaks below thee!

 
Elizabeth Barrett Browning (6 maart 1806 – 29 juni 1861)
Elizabeth Barrett Browning en haar cocker spaniel, Flush. Illustratie door James E. McConnell

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Stéphane Hoffmann, Michelangelo, Teru Miyamoto, Nicolas Bouvier, Jan Kjærstad”

Gabriel García Márquez, Marijke Hanegraaf, Günter Kunert, Clark Accord, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Stéphane Hoffmann, Michelangelo, Teru Miyamoto

De Colombiaanse schrijver Gabriel García Márquez werd op 6 maart 1928 in de kustplaats Aracataca geboren. Zie ook alle tags voor Gabriel García Márquez op dit blog.

Uit: Honderd jaar eenzaamheid (Vertaald door C.A.G. van den Broek)

“Ze gaf opdracht tot de bouw van een salon voor de visite, een gerieflijker en koeler vertrek voor dagelijks gebruik, een eetzaal voor een tafel met twaalf plaatsen waaraan de familie met twaalf gasten kon aanzitten, negen slaapkamers met ramen die uitkwamen op de patio en een grote waranda die tegen de hitte van het middaguur beschermd moest worden door een rozentuin en voorzien moest zijn van een balustrade waarop potten met varens en vazen met begonia’s konden worden geplaatst.”
(…)

“En ze hoefde ook niet te kunnen kijken om te beseffen dat de bloemperken, die tijdens de eerste verbouwing met zoveel toewijding waren verzorgd, door de regen vernietigd en door Aureliano Segundo’s graafwerk omgespit waren en dat de wanden en de cementen vloeren vol scheuren zaten, de meubels wankel en verschoten waren, de deuren uit hun hengsels hingen en de familie bedreigd werd door een gelaten, zwartgallige stemming die in haar tijd ondenkbaar zou zijn geweest.” 
(…)

“Toen sloeg hij nog een stukje over om op de voorspellingen vooruit te lopen en de datum en de omstandigheden van zijn dood op te zoeken. Maar nog voordat hij bij het laatste vers was gekomen had hij al begrepen dat hij deze kamer nooit meer zou verlaten, want het stond geschreven dat de stad van de spiegels (of spiegelingen) door de wind weggevaagd en uit de herinnering der mensen weggewist zou worden zodra Aureliano Babilonia de perkamenten tot het einde toe ontcijferd had – en dat alles, wat daarin beschreven stond, voor altijd en eeuwig onherhaalbaar was, omdat de geslachten, die gedoemd zijn tot honderd jaar eenzaamheid, geen tweede kans krijgen op aarde.”

 
Gabriel García Márquez (6 maart 1928 – 17 april 2014)

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Gabriel García Márquez, Marijke Hanegraaf, Günter Kunert, Clark Accord, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Stéphane Hoffmann, Michelangelo, Teru Miyamoto”

Gabriel García Márquez, Günter Kunert, Clark Accord, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Stéphane Hoffmann, Michelangelo, Teru Miyamoto

De Colombiaanse schrijver Gabriel García Márquez werd op 6 maart 1928 in de kustplaats Aracataca geboren. Zie ook alle tags voor Gabriel García Márquez op dit blog.

Uit: Memories of My Melancholy Whores (Vertaald door Edith Grossman)

“The year I turned ninety, I wanted to give myself the gift of a night of wild love with an adolescent virgin. I thought of Rosa Cabarcas, the owner of an illicit house who would inform her good clients when she had a new girl available. I never succumbed to that or to any of her many other lewd temptations, but she did not believe in the purity of my principles. Morality, too, is a question of time, she would say with a malevolent smile, you’ll see. She was a little younger than I, and I hadn’t heard anything about her for so many years that she very well might have died. But after the first ring I recognized the voice on the phone, and with no preambles I fired at her:
“Today’s the day.”
She sighed: Ah, my sad scholar, you disappear for twenty years and come back only to ask for the impossible. She regained mastery of her art at once and offered me half a dozen delectable options, but all of them, to be frank, were used. I said no, insisting the girl had to be a virgin and available that very night. She asked in alarm: What are you trying to prove? Nothing, I replied, wounded to the core, I know very well what I can and cannot do. Unmoved, she said that scholars may know it all, but they don’t know everything: The only Virgos left in the world are people like you who were born in August. Why didn’t you give me more time? Inspiration gives no warnings, I said. But perhaps it can wait, she said, always more knowledgeable than any man, and she asked for just two days to make a thorough investigation of the market.
I replied in all seriousness that in an affair such as this, at my age, each hour is like a year. Then it can’t be done, she said without the slightest doubt, but it doesn’t matter, it’s more exciting this way, what the hell, I’ll call you in an hour.
I don’t have to say it because people can see it from leagues away: I’m ugly, shy, and anachronistic. But by dint of not wanting to be those things I have pretended to be just the opposite. Until today, when I have resolved to tell of my own free will just what I’m like, if only to ease my conscience. I have begun with my unusual call to Rosa Cabarcas because, seen from the vantage point of today, that was the beginning of a new life at an age when most mortals have already died.”

 
Gabriel García Márquez (Aracataca, 6 maart 1928)

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Gabriel García Márquez, Günter Kunert, Clark Accord, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Stéphane Hoffmann, Michelangelo, Teru Miyamoto”

Gabriel García Márquez, Günter Kunert, Clark Accord, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Stéphane Hoffmann, Michelangelo

De Colombiaanse schrijver Gabriel García Márquez werd op 6 maart 1928 in de kustplaats Aracataca geboren. Zie ook alle tags voor Gabriel García Márquez op dit blog.

 

Uit: One Hundred Years of Solitude (Vertaald door Gregory Rabassa)

“When José Arcadio Buendía and the four men of his expedition managed to take the armour apart, they found inside a calcified skeleton with a copper locket containing a woman’s hair around its neck.

In March the gypsies returned. This time they brought a telescope and a magnifying glass the size of a drum, which they exhibited as the latest discovery of the Jews of Amsterdam. They placed a gypsy woman at one end of the village and set up the telescope at the entrance to the tent. For the price of five reales, people could look into the telescope and see the gypsy woman an arm’s length away. ‘Science has eliminated distance,’ Melquíades proclaimed. ‘In a short time, man will be able to see what is happening in any place in the world without leaving his own house.’ A burning noonday sun brought out a startling demonstration with the gigantic magnifying glass: they put a pile of dry hay in the middle of the street and set it on fire by concentrating the sun’s rays. José Arcadio Buendía, who had still not been consoled for the failure of his magnets, conceived the idea of using that invention as a weapon of war. Again Melquíades tried to dissuade him, but he finally accepted the two magnetized ingots and three colonial coins in exchange for the magnifying glass. Úrsula wept in consternation. That money was from a chest of gold coins that her father had put together over an entire life of privation and that she had buried underneath her bed in hopes of a proper occasion to make use of it. José Arcadio Buendía made no attempt to console her, completely absorbed in his tactical experiments with the abnegation of a scientist and even at the risk of his own life. In an attempt to show the effects of the glass on enemy troops, he exposed himself to the concentration of the sun’s rays and suffered burns which turned into sores that took a long time to heal. Over the protests of his wife, who was alarmed at such a dangerous invention, at one point he was ready to set the house on fire. He would spend hours on end in his room, calculating the strategic possibilities of his novel weapon until he succeeded in putting together a manual of startling instructional clarity and an irresistible power of conviction. He sent it to the government, accompanied by numerous descriptions of his experiments and several pages of explanatory sketches, by a messenger who crossed the mountains, got lost in measureless swamps, forded stormy rivers, and was on the point of perishing under the lash of despair, plague, and wild beasts until he found a route that joined the one used by the mules that carried the mail.”

 

Gabriel García Márquez (Aracataca, 6 maart 1928)

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Gabriel García Márquez, Günter Kunert, Clark Accord, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Stéphane Hoffmann, Michelangelo”

Teru Miyamoto, Nicolas Bouvier, Jan Kjærstad, Michelangelo

De Japanse schrijver Teru Miyamoto werd geboren op 6 maart 1947 in Kobe. Zie ook alle tags voor Tery Miyamoto op dit blog.

 

Uit: Kinshu: Autumn Brocade (Vertaald door Roger K Thomas)

„He divides his time equally between Kôroen and the Aoyama condominium. Around the beginning of October, when the company car came to pick him up, he lost his footing going down the stone staircase in front of the condominium and injured his ankle badly-a hairline fracture and a good deal of swelling, which left him unable to walk. In a panic, I jumped on the Shinkansen bullet train with Kiyotaka and rushed to see him. No sooner had he lost his mobility than he became difficult to deal with. He disliked the fussy way Ikuko looked after him, and telephoned for me to come over though I had just left. Thinking that it might turn out to be a long stay, I had no choice but to take Kiyotaka along. As soon as Father saw our faces he calmed down. Perhaps worrying about the house in Kôroen, he perversely started to say that we should go back right away. I didn’t know whether to be amazed or amused by his willfulness. Entrusting him to the care of Ikuko and Okabe, his secretary, I decided to return to Kôroen and left for Tokyo Station with Kiyotaka.

It was there that I saw a travel poster for Mount Zaô.The large photograph was filled with the spreading branches of brightly colored trees in autumn. I had always associated Zaô with its ice-covered trees in winter, and I stood in the Tokyo Station concourse imagining how these trees-which would become pillars of ice, but were now brilliant with autumn foliage-would look swaying in the breeze under a star-studded night sky. For some reason, I felt an irresistible urge to let my handicapped child experience the invigorating mountains and see all the stars. When I told Kiyotaka this, his eyes brightened and he begged me to take him there. Although it seemed too much of an adventure for the two of us, we went to a travel agent inside the station and bought train tickets to Yamagata. Then we made reservations at an inn at Zaô. Hot Spring, and tried to reserve return seats on a flight from Sendai to Osaka Airport. No seats were available, though, and we had to change our plans and stay an extra night at either Zaô or Sendai before our return flight. I decided to stay two nights at Zaô so we headed for Ueno Station to catch the tram there. If we had stayed only one night at Zaô. I would not have run into you. It all seems very strange to me now.“

 

Teru Miyamoto (Kobe, 6 maart 1947)

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Teru Miyamoto, Nicolas Bouvier, Jan Kjærstad, Michelangelo”