Dolce far niente, Jill McDonough, Jan Eijkelboom, Wystan Hugh Auden

Dolce far niente – Canal Parade, Amsterdam

 

 
Gay Pride and Diversity door Neil McBride, z.j.

 

Dear Gaybashers

The night we got bashed we told Rusty how
they drove up, yelled QUEER, threw a hot dog, sped off.

Rusty: Now, is that gaybashing? Or
are they just calling you queer? Good point.

Josey pitied the fools: who buys a perfectly good pack of wieners
and drives around San Francisco chucking them at gays?

And who speeds off? Missing the point, the pleasure of the bash?
Dear bashers, you should have seen the hot dog hit my neck,

the scarf Josey sewed from antique silk kimonos: so gay. You
missed laughing at us, us confused, your raw hot dog on the ground.

Josey and Rusty and Bob make fun of the gaybashers, and I
wash my scarf in the sink. I use Woolite. We worry

about insurance, interest rates. Not hot dogs thrown from F-150s,
homophobic freaks. After the bashing, we used the ATM

in the sex shop next to Annie’s Social Club, smiled at the kind
owner, his handlebar mustache. Astrud Gilberto sang tall and tan

and young and lovely, the girl from Ipanema… and the dildos
gleamed from the walls, a hundred cheerful colors. In San Francisco

it rains hot dogs, pity-the-fool. Ass-sized penguins, cock after cock in
azure acrylic, butterscotch glass, anyone’s flesh-tone, chrome.

 


Jill McDonough (Hartford, Connecticut, 1972)

 

 

 
Couples door Raphael Perez, z.j.

 

Voorkeur

Liefde:
de kortste eeuwigheid.
Laat het maar vriendschap zijn,
dan heeft het alle tijd.

 

 
Jan Eijkelboom (1 maart 1926 – 28 februari 2008)

 

 

 
Orpheus door Richard Taddei, z.j.

 

Lullaby

Lay your sleeping head, my love,
Human on my faithless arm;
Time and fevers burn away
Individual beauty from
Thoughtful children, and the grave
Proves the child ephemeral:
But in my arms till break of day
Let the living creature lie,
Mortal, guilty, but to me
The entirely beautiful.

Soul and body have no bounds:
To lovers as they lie upon
Her tolerant enchanted slope
In their ordinary swoon,
Grave the vision Venus sends
Of supernatural sympathy,
Universal love and hope;
While an abstract insight wakes
Among the glaciers and the rocks
The hermit’s carnal ecstasy.

Certainty, fidelity
On the stroke of midnight pass
Like vibrations of a bell,
And fashionable madmen raise
Their pedantic boring cry:
Every farthing of the cost,
All the dreaded cards foretell,
Shall be paid, but from this night
Not a whisper, not a thought,
Not a kiss nor look be lost.

Beauty, midnight, vision dies:
Let the winds of dawn that blow
Softly round your dreaming head
Such a day of welcome show
Eye and knocking heart may bless,
Find the mortal world enough;
Noons of dryness find you fed
By the involuntary powers,
Nights of insult let you pass
Watched by every human love.

 

 
Wystan Hugh Auden (21 februari 1907 – 29 september 1973)

 

Zie voor de schrijvers van de 4e augustus ook mijn blog van 4 augustus 2017 en ook mijn blog van 4 augustus 2013 en mijn blog van 4 augustus 2011 deel 1 en ook deel 2 en eveneens deel 3 en mijn blog over Robert Beck.

Jill McDonough

 

Onafhankelijk van geboortedata

De Amerikaanse dichteres Jill McDonough werd geboren in Hartford, Connecticut in 1972 en groeide op in North Carolina. Ze behaalde haar Bachelor of Arts in het Engels aan Stamford University en een MA in creatief schrijven aan Boston University. Ze is getrouwd met barman en muzikant Josey Packard. Ze heeft over haar huwelijk geschreven in een essay getiteld “A Natural History of my Marriage”. Jill McDonough publiceerde o.a. de bundels “Habeas Corpus” (2008), “Where You Live” (2012), “Reaper” (2017), “Here All Night” en meerdere chapbooks, waaronder “Oh, James!” (2012). Zij ontving beurzen van de National Endowment for the Arts, het Fine Arts Work Centre, de New York Public Library, de Library of Congress, de Lannan Foundation en Stanford’s Wallace Stegner-programma. Ook gaf zij 13 jaar lang les aan gedetineerde studenten via het gevangenisonderwijs van de Boston University. Haar werk is verschenen in Poetry, Slate, the Nation, Threepenny Review en Best American Poetry. Ze leidt het MFA-programma op UMass-Boston en 24PearlStreet, het Fine Arts Work Centre online.

 

Three a.m.

Our cabdriver tells us how Somalia is better
than here because in Islam we execute murderers.
So, fewer murders. But isn’t there civil war
there now? Aren’t there a lot of murders?
Yes, but in general it’s better. Not
now, but most of the time. He tells us about how
smart the system is, how it’s hard to bear
false witness. We nod. We’re learning a lot.
I say—once we are close to the house—I say, What
about us? Two women, married to each other.
Don’t be offended, he says, gravely. But a man
with a man, a woman with a woman: it would be
a public execution. We nod. A little silence along
the Southeast Corridor. Then I say, Yeah,
I love my country. This makes him laugh; we all laugh.
We aren’t offended, says Josey. We love you. Sometimes
I feel like we’re proselytizing, spreading the Word of Gay.
The cab is shaking with laughter, the poor man
relieved we’re not mad he sort of wants us dead.
The two of us soothing him, wanting him comfortable,
wanting him to laugh. We love our country,
we tell him. And Josey tips him. She tips him well.

 

Twelve-Hour Shifts

A drone pilot works a twelve-hour shift, then goes home
to real life.  Showers, eats supper, plays video games.
Twelve hours later he comes back, high-fives, takes over the
drone

from other pilots, who watch Homeland, do dishes, hope they
don’t
dream in all screens, bad kills, all slo-mo freeze-frame.
A drone pilot works a twelve-hour shift, then goes home.

A small room, a pilot’s chair, the mic and headphones
crowd his mind, take him somewhere else.  Another day
another dollar: hover and shift, twelve hours over strangers’
homes.

Stop by the store, its Muzak, pick up the Cheerios,
get to the gym if you’re lucky.  Get back to your babies, play
Barbies, play blocks. Twelve hours later, come back.  Take over
the drone.

Smell of burned coffee in the lounge, the shifting kill zone.
Last-minute abort mission, and the major who forgets your
name.
A drone pilot works a twelve-hour shift, then goes home.

It’s done in our names, but we don’t have to know.  Our own
lives, shifts, hours, bounced off screens all day.
A drone pilot works a twelve-hour shift, then goes home;
fresh from twelve hours off, another comes in, takes over our
drone.

 


Jill McDonough (Hartford, Connecticut, 1972)