Marcelin Pleynet, Norman Maclean, Sara Coleridge, J.J.L. ten Kate, Giusepe di Lampedusa, Iván Mándy

De Franse dichter, schrijver en essayist Marcelin Pleynet werd geboren op 23 december 1933 in Lyon. Zie ook alle tags voor Marcelin Pleynet op dit blog.

Uit: Chagall en France

« Chagall arrive pour la première fois à Paris en 1910, il a vingt-trois ans, il n’en repartira qu’en 1914, pour revenir en 1923 et rester en France jusqu’à ce que la guerre l’en chasse, en 1941. Il séjournera alors aux États-Unis, de 1941 à 1948, date à laquelle il s’installe définitivement en France.
Si l’on fait le compte, on constate que Chagall a passé plus des deux tiers de sa vie en France, et notamment dans la maturité de son âge et de son art.
Certes, dans un poème qui fut très souvent reproduit, Chagall prend soin de préciser : « Seul est le mien / Le pays qui se trouve dans mon âme », avant de poursuivre en développant les thèmes qui illustrent son œuvre : « En moi fleurissent des jardins / Mes fleurs sont inventées / Les rues m’appartiennent / Mais il n’y a pas de maisons / Elles ont été détruites dès mon enfance / Les habitants vagabondent dans l’air / À la recherche d’un logis / Ils habitent mon âme.»
Ce qui est une autre façon de dire que le seul pays qu’il se reconnaît est celui que déploient sa peinture et son âme (l’âme de sa peinture), et que sa peinture ne connaît pas de frontière. Et en effet la peinture de Chagall ne connaît pas de frontière, elle est certainement aujourd’hui l’œuvre la plus universelle qui soit. Pourtant, Chagall vécut près de soixante ans en France et il n’a jamais manqué de souligner (alors même qu’il s’était momentanément installé aux États-Unis) tout ce qui le rattachait à l’art et à la culture française.
En 1943, lors d’une conférence prononcée au « Pontigny » franco-américain, à Mount’Holyoke College et publiée dans La Renaissance, revue de l’École libre des hautes études de New York, Chagall déclare : « Je suis arrivé à Paris comme poussé par le destin .. Le soleil de l’art ne brillait alors qu’à Paris, et il me semblait et il me semble jusqu’à présent qu’il n’y a pas de plus grande révolution de l’œil que celle que j’ai rencontrée en 1910, à mon arrivée à Paris. Les paysages, les figures de Cézanne, Manet, Monet, Seurat, Renoir, Van Gogh, le fauvisme de Matisse et tant d’autres me stupéfièrent. Ils m’attiraient comme un phénomène de la nature.”

 
Marcelin Pleynet (Lyon, 23 december 1933)
La joie familiale door Marc Chagall, 1976

 

De Amerikaanse schrijver Norman Fitzroy Maclean werd geboren op 23 december 1902 in Clarinda, Iowa. Zie ook alle tags voor Norman Maclean op dit blog.

Uit: A River Runs Through It

“The fight seemed suddenly to stop itself. She was lying on the floor IletNN cell us. Then we but h began to cry and fight in a rage, each one shouting, “You son of bitch, you knocked my mother down.” She got off the floor, and, blind without her glasses, staggered in circles between us, saying without recognizing which one she was addressing, “No, it wasn’t you. I just slipped and fell.” So this was the only time we ever fought. Perhaps we always wondered which of us eras tougher, but, if boyhood questions aren’t answered before a certain point in time, they can’t ever be raised again. So we returned to being gracious to each other, as the wall sug-gested that we should be. We also felt that the woods and rivers were gracious to us when we walked together beside them. It is true that we didn’t often fish together anymore. We were both in our early thirties now, and “now” from here on is the summer of 1937. My ft tiler had retired and he and mother were living in Missoula, our old home town, and Paul was a reporter in Helena, the state capital. I had “gone off and got married,” to use my brother’s description of this event in my life. At the moment, I was living with my wife’s family in the little town of Wolf Creek, but, since Wolf Creek is only forty miles from Helena, we still saw each other from time to time, which meant, of course, fishing now and then together. In fact, the reason I had come to Helena now was to see him about fishing. The fact also is that my mother-in-law had asked me to. I wasn’t happy, but I was fairly sure my brother would finally say yes. He had never said plain no to me, and he loved my mother-in-law and my wife, whom he included in the si gn on the wall, even though he could never under-stand “what had come over me” that would explain why marriage had ever crossed my mind. I ran into him in front of the Montana Club, which was built by rich gold miners supposedly on the spot where gold was discovered in Last Chance Gulch.”


Norman Maclean (23 december 1902 – 2 augustus 1990)
Scene uit de film van Robert Redford uit 1992 met Craig Sheffer (Norman) en Brad Pitt (Paul)

 

De Engelse dichteres, schrijfster en vertaalster Sara Coleridge werd geboren op 23 december 1802 in Greta Hall, Keswick. Zie ook alle tags voor Sara Coleridge op dit blog.

The Boy That Would Rather Be Naughty Than Good (Fragment)

Young Ronald one day in a fury was roaring,
His passion still higher and higher was soaring;
Cried he, while the tears from his eyelids were pouring,
“I’d rather be naughty than good!”
To learn stupid lessons I’ll never engage,
I’ll storm, and I’ll bluster and riot and rage,
I ne’er will consent to be kept in a cage,
I will go and walk in the wood.”

His mother, astonished, cried “Ronald, for shame!
This terrible temper unless you can tame,
Such folly the rod must be called to reclaim,
And every one else will be ruffled.
Don’t stare with your eyes, and don’t wrinkle your brow,
Nor stamp and kick up such a dust and a row,
Nor shake your head angrily like the mad cow
Whose horns the old farmer has muffled.

 
Sara Coleridge (23 december 1802 – 3 mei 1852)

 

De Nederlandse dichter-dominee Jan Jakob Lodewijk ten Kate werd geboren op 23 december 1819 in Den Haag. Zie ook alle tags voor J.J.L. ten Kate op dit blog.

Bloemkrans
voor de liefste

Wanneer, ook dán als de andre tekens zwijgen,
De ziel haar zucht in kleuren wedergeeft,
De Min haar blos in ’t rozenblad doet stijgen,
De Erinnring in ’t vergeet-mij-nietje beeft;
Als Hope fladdert in de groene twijgen,
De Rouw in ’t lover der cypresse zweeft;
Als Jaloezij de gele tulp doet hijgen,
De Glorie in de frissen lauwer leeft:

Dan diende ik U een bonte krans te schenken,
Waaruit ge U álle kleuren toe zag wenken
Op ’t levendig fluweel van blad en bloem:
Gij immers zijt mijn Liefde, mijn Herdenken,
Mijn Vreugde en Smart, mijn IJver en mijn Roem,
Die ik de mijne in dood en leven noem!

 

Werd de Liefde eens geknakt

Werd de Liefde eens geknakt in haar tedere knop,
Tot haar blaren verwelkten en vielen,
Geen genegenheids-zon wekt haar leven weer op,
Want maar eens bloeit de lente der zielen.

Is de Hope misleid, dan ontvlucht zij het hart,
En keert weer door beloften noch giften;
Maar de Erinnring blijft achter en leeft van de smart,
En broedt voort op de puinhoop der driften.

Men verhaalt, dat de zwaluw haar nestje ontwijkt,
Als de stormwind de gevel doet kraken;
Maar de nachtuil keert in tot het huis dat bezwijkt,
Waar ze bouwt in een klove der daken.

 

Sonnet op het Sonnet

Geverfde pop, met rinkelen omhangen,
Gebulte jonkvrouw in uw staal’ korset,
Lamzaligste aller vormen, stijf Sonnet!
Wat rijmziek mispunt deed u ’t licht erlangen?

Te klein om één goed denkbeeld op te vangen,
Voor epigram te groot en te koket,
Vooraf geknipt, koepletje voor koeplet,
Kroopt ge onverdiend in onze minnezangen.

Neen! de echte Muze eist vrijheid; en het Lied,
Onhoudbaar uit het zwoegend hart gerezen,
Zij als een bergstroom die zijn band ontschiet!

Gij deugt tot niets, tenzij het deugen hiet,
Om, enkel door de broddelaars geprezen,
Op Geysbeek een berijmd vervolg te wezen.


J.J.L. ten Kate (23 december 1819 – 24 december 1889)

 

De Italiaanse schrijver Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa werd geboren in Palermo op 23 december 1896. Zie ook alle tags voor Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa op dit blog.

Uit: The Leopard (Vertaald door Archibald Colquhoun)

“And the Sedira, all the various Sedira, from the petty one who violated arithmetic at Donnafugata to the major ones at Palermo and Turin, had they not committed a crime by choking such consciences? Don Fabrizio could not know it then, but a great deal of the slackness and acquiescence for which the people of the South were to be criticised during the next decade, was due to the stupid annulment of the first expression of liberty ever offered them. Don Ciccio had said his say. And now his genuine but rarely shown side of “austere man of principle” was taken over by one much more frequent and no less genuine, that of snob. For Tumeo belonged to the zoological species of “passive snob”, a species unjustly reviled nowadays. Of course the word “snob” was unknown in the Sicily of 186o; but just as tuberculosis existed before Koch, so in that remote era there were people for whom to obey, imitate and above all avoid distressing those whom they considered of higher social rank than themselves was the supreme law of life; snobbery, in fact, is the opposite of envy. At that time a man of this type went under various names; he was called “devoted”, “attached”, “faithful;” and life was happy for him since a nobleman’s most fugitive smile was enough to flood an entire day with sun; and accompanied by such affectionate appellatives, the restorative graces were more frequent than they are to-day. Now Don Ciccio’s frankly snobbish nature made him fear causing Don Fabrizio distress, and he searched diligently round for ways to disperse any frowns he might be causing on the Prince’s Olympian brow; the best means to hand was suggesting they should start shooting again; and so they did. Surprised in their afternoon naps some wretched woodcock and another rabbit fell under the marks-men’s fire, particularly accurate and pitiless that day as both Salina and Tumeo were identifying those innocent creatures with Don Calogero Sedira.”


Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa (23 december 1896 – 23 juli 1957)
Claudia Cardinale en Alain Delon in de gelijknamige film van Luchino Visconti, 1963

 

De Hongaarse schrijver Iván Mándy werd geboren op 23 december 1918 in Boedapest. Zie ook alle tags voor Iván Mándy op dit blog.

Uit: The Watermelon Eaters (Vertaald door Albert Tezla)

“And the Sedira, all the various Sedira, from the petty one who violated arithmetic at Donnafugata to the major ones at Palermo and Turin, had they not committed a crime by choking such consciences? Don Fabrizio could not know it then, but a great deal of the slackness and acquiescence for which the people of the South were to be criticised during the next decade, was due to the stupid annulment of the first expression of liberty ever offered them. Don Ciccio had said his say. And now his genuine but rarely shown side of “austere man of principle” was taken over by one much more frequent and no less genuine, that of snob. For Tumeo belonged to the zoological species of “passive snob”, a species unjustly reviled nowadays. Of course the word “snob” was unknown in the Sicily of 186o; but just as tuberculosis existed before Koch, so in that remote era there were people for whom to obey, imitate and above all avoid distressing those whom they considered of higher social rank than themselves was the supreme law of life; snobbery, in fact, is the opposite of envy. At that time a man of this type went under various names; he was called “devoted”, “attached”, “faithful;” and life was happy for him since a nobleman’s most fugitive smile was enough to flood an entire day with sun; and accompanied by such affectionate appellatives, the restorative graces were more frequent than they are to-day. Now Don Ciccio’s frankly snobbish nature made him fear causing Don Fabrizio distress, and he searched diligently round for ways to disperse any frowns he might be causing on the Prince’s Olympian brow; the best means to hand was suggesting they should start shooting again; and so they did. Surprised in their afternoon naps some wretched woodcock and another rabbit fell under the marks-men’s fire, particularly accurate and pitiless that day as both Salina and Tumeo were identifying those innocent creatures with Don Calogero Sedira.”


Iván Mándy (23 december 1918 – 26 oktober 1995)
Adventstijd in Boedapest

 

Zie voor nog meer schrijvers van de 23e december ook mijn vorige blog van vandaag.

 

Giusepe di Lampedusa, Iván Mándy, Christa Winsloe, Albert Ehrenstein, Harry Shearer, Charles Sainte-Beuve, Mathilde Wesendonck, Martin Opitz

De Italiaanse schrijver Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa werd geboren in Palermo op 23 december 1896. Zie ook alle tags voor Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa op dit blog.

Uit: The Leopard (Vertaald door Archibald Colquhoun)

“Don Ciccio was still thundering on: “For you nobles it’s different. You might be ungrateful about an extra estate, but we must be grateful for a bit of bread. It’s different again for profiteers like Sedira with whom cheating is a law of nature. Small folk like us have to take things as they come. You know, Excellency, that my father, God rest his soul, was gamekeeper at the royal shoot of Sant’ Onofrio back in Ferdinand IV’s time, when the English were here? It was a hard life, but the green royal livery and the silver plaque conferred authority. Queen Isabella, the Spaniard, was Duchess of Calabria then, and it was she who had me study, made me what I am now, organist of the Mother Church, honoured by your Excellency’s kindness; when my mother sent off a petition to Court in our years of greatest need, back came five gold ounces, sure as death, for they were fond of us there in Naples, they knew we were decent folk and faithful subjects; when the King came he used to clap my father on the shoulder. ‘Don Liona,’ he said, ‘I wish we’d more like you, devoted to the throne and to my Person.’ Then the officer in attendance used to hand out gold coin. Alms, they call it now, that truly royal generosity; and they call it that so as not to give any themselves; but it was just a reward for loyalty. And if those holy Kings and lovely Queens are looking down at us from heaven to-day, what’ld they say? °The son of Don Leonardo Tumeo betrayed us!’ Luckily the truth is known in Paradise! Yes, Excellency, I know, people like you have told me, such things from royalty mean nothing, they’re just part of the job. That may be true, in fact is true. But we got those five gold ounces, that’s a fact, and they helped us through the winter. And now I could repay the debt my ‘no’ becomes a `yes’! I used to be a ‘faithful subject’, I’ve become a ‘filthy Bourbonite’. Everyone’s Savoyard nowadays! But I take `Savoyards’ with coffee!” And he dipped an invisible biscuit between finger and thumb into an imaginary cup. Don Fabrizio had always liked Don Ciccio, partly because of the compassion inspired in him by all who from youth had thought of themselves as dedicated to the Arts, and in old age, realising they had no talent, still carried on the same activity at lower levels, pocketing withered dreams; and he was also touched by the dignity of his poverty. But now he also felt a kind of admiration for him, and deep down at the very bottom of his proud conscience a voice was asking if Don Ciccio had not perhaps behaved more nobly than the Prince of Salina. »

 
Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa (23 december 1896 – 23 juli 1957)
Claudia Cardinale en Alain Delon in de gelijknamige film van Luchino Visconti, 1963

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Giusepe di Lampedusa, Iván Mándy, Christa Winsloe, Albert Ehrenstein, Harry Shearer, Charles Sainte-Beuve, Mathilde Wesendonck, Martin Opitz”

Robert Bly, Norman Maclean, Sara Coleridge, Donna Tartt, Tim Fountain, Marcelin Pleynet, Iván Mándy, J.J.L. ten Kate

De Amerikaanse dichter en schrijver Robert Bly werd geboren op 23 december 1926 in Madison, Minnesota. Zie ook alle tags voor Robert Bly op dit blog.

A Dream On The Night Of First Snow

I woke flour a first-day-of-snow dream.
I dreamt I met a girl in an attic,
who talked of operas, intensely.
Snow has bent the poplar over nearly to the ground,
new snowfall widens the plowing.
Outside maple leaves floated on rainwater,
yellow, matted, luminous.
I found a salamander! and held him.
When I put him down again,
he strode over a log
with such confidence, like a chessmaster,
the front leg first, then the hind
leg, he rose up like a tractor climbing
over a hump in the field
and disappeared toward winter, a caravan going deeper into
mountams,
dogs pulling travois,
feathers fluttering on the lance: of the arrogant men.

 

Poems in Three Parts

1
Oh on an early morning I think I shall live forever!
I am wrapped in my joyful flesh
As the grass is wrapped in its clouds of green.

2
Rising from a bed where I dreamt
Of long rides past castles and hot coals
The sun lies happily on my knees;
I have suffered and survived the night
Bathed in dark water like any blade of grass.

3
The strong leaves of the box-elder tree
Plunging in the wind call us to disappear
Into the wilds of the universe
Where we shall sit at the foot of a plant
And live forever like the dust.

 

Gratitude To Old Teachers

When we stride or stroll across the frozen lake,
We place our feet where they have never been.
We walk upon the unwalked. But we are uneasy.
Who is down there but our old teachers?
Water that once could take no human weight-
We were students then- holds up our feet,
And goes on ahead of us for a mile.
Beneath us the teachers, and around us the stillness.

 
Robert Bly (Madison, 23 december 1926)

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Robert Bly, Norman Maclean, Sara Coleridge, Donna Tartt, Tim Fountain, Marcelin Pleynet, Iván Mándy, J.J.L. ten Kate”

Robert Bly, Norman Maclean, Sara Coleridge, Donna Tartt, Marcelin Pleynet, Iván Mándy, J.J.L. ten Kate, Tim Fountain

De Amerikaanse dichter en schrijver Robert Bly werd geboren op 23 december 1926 in Madison, Minnesota. Zie ook alle tags voor Robert Bly op dit blog.

For My Son Noah Ten Years Old

Nigh and day arrive and day after day goes by
And what is old remains old and what is young remains young and grows old.
The lumber pile does not grow younger nor the two-by-fours lose their darkness
but the old tree goes on the barn stands without help so many years;
the advocate of darkness and night is not lost.

The horse steps up swings on one leg turns its body
the chicken flapping claws onto the roost its wings whelping and walloping
but what is primitive is not to be shot out into the night and the dark.
And slowly the kind man comes closer loses his rage sits down at table.

So I am proud only of those days that pass in undivided tenderness
when you sit drawing or making books stapled with messages to the world
or coloring a man with fire coming out of his hair.
Or we sit at a table with small tea carefully poured.
So we pass our time together calm and delighted.

 

In Rainy September

In rainy September when leaves grow down to the dark
I put my forehead down to the damp seaweed-smelling sand.
What can we do but choose? The only way for human beings
is to choose.
The fern has no choice but to live;
for this crime it receives earth water and night.

we close the door. “I have no claim on you.”
Dusk comes. “The love I have had with you is enough.”
We know we could live apart from the flock.
The sheldrake floats apart from the flock.
The oaktree puts out leaves alone on the lonely hillside.

Men and women before us have accomplished this.
I would see you and you me once a year.
We would be two kernels and not be planted.
We stay in the room door closed lights out.
I weep with you without shame and without honor.

 

Wanting Sumptuous Heavens

No one grumbles among the oyster clans,
And lobsters play their bone guitars all summer.
Only we, with our opposable thumbs, want
Heaven to be, and God to come, again.
There is no end to our grumbling; we want
Comfortable earth and sumptuous Heaven.
But the heron standing on one leg in the bog
Drinks his dark rum all day, and is content.

 
Robert Bly (Madison, 23 december 1926)

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Robert Bly, Norman Maclean, Sara Coleridge, Donna Tartt, Marcelin Pleynet, Iván Mándy, J.J.L. ten Kate, Tim Fountain”

Robert Bly, Norman Maclean, Marcelin Pleynet, Iván Mándy, J.J.L. ten Kate, Tim Fountain

De Amerikaanse dichter en schrijver Robert Bly werd geboren op 23 december 1926 in Madison, Minnesota. Zie ook alle tags voor Robert Bly op dit blog.

Snowfall in the Afternoon

1
The grass is half-covered with snow.
It was the sort of snowfall that starts in late afternoon
And now the little houses of the grass are growing dark.

2
If I reached my hands down near the earth
I could take handfuls of darkness!
A darkness was always there which we never noticed.

3
As the snow grows heavier the cornstalks fade farther away
And the barn moves nearer to the house.
The barn moves all alone in the growing storm.

4
The barn is full of corn and moves toward us now
Like a hulk blown toward us in a storm at sea;
All the sailors on deck have been blind for many years.

 

The Hermit

Darkness is falling through darkness
Falling from ledge
To ledge.
There is a man whose body is perfectly whole.
He stands the storm behind him
And the grass blades are leaping in the wind.
Darkness is gathered in folds
About his feet.
He is no one. When we see
Him we grow calm
And sail on into the tunnels of joyful death.

 

At Midocean

All day I loved you in a fever holding on to the tail of the horse.
I overflowed whenever I reached out to touch you.
My hand moved over your body covered
With its dress
Burning rough an animal’s hand or foot moving over leaves.
The rainstorm retires clouds open sunlight
sliding over ocean water a thousand miles from land.

  
Robert Bly (Madison, 23 december 1926)

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Robert Bly, Norman Maclean, Marcelin Pleynet, Iván Mándy, J.J.L. ten Kate, Tim Fountain”

Iván Mándy, J.J.L. ten Kate, Christa Winsloe, Albert Ehrenstein, Harry Shearer

De Hongaarse schrijver Iván Mándy werd geboren op 23 december 1918 in Boedapest. Zie ook alle tags voor Iván Mándy op dit blog.

 

Uit: The Watermelon Eaters (Vertaald door Albert Tezla)

“A face was ascending the stairs, a face so long and stony it seemed to be borne on a platter. Its eyes closed, its mouth a straight, hard line. On this blinded face was visible the restaurant with its cold mirrors, tiny tables, and guests who failed to notice the face. The outstretched, dead hand then rose into view, trailing an invisible veil. A blue-gray greatcoat, closed at the neck, held the entire man together like a sack. He passed by the boxes and stopped in the middle under a chandelier. He raised his head in the glittering light; his face and hands glistened, but his tunic remained dark. He stood there wordless, motionless, his face flung open to the light, his hands thrust out. Slowly, slowly, as if searching for someone, he turned to one of the boxes.

Three persons were sitting in the box: two women with a pimply-faced youth. The woman with gray hair lifted her fork, then put it down, and said: “Poor thing.” The girl ate and didn’t look up from her plate. She had thick blonde hair, her arms were firm and darkly tanned as if she were sitting on the edge of a swimming pool.

The boy groped in his pocket.

The girl looked up.

“I will!”

The blind man caught the coin with a sweep of one hand, but by then he was being held by the arms. A waiter with a trimmed mustache was standing behind him; he pushed him forward slowly. The blind man opened his mouth wide, he became an astonished black hole.

“You know that’s not permitted,” and the waiter shoved him down the stairs. The beggar tripped and his hand banged against the banister. He remained there hanging on to it, his head slumped forward lifelessly. The waiter grabbed his shoulders and stood him up on his feet like a rag doll. “Don’t be such an ass!”

Half risen, Károly, the pimply-faced boy, was observing him. His head slumped forward again, and meantime his dark, gaping mouth seemed to sneer. His sister touched his hand.

“Why are you staring?”

Ágnes’s taut, impassive face, with two blue earrings, shut out everything in front of her. She lit a cigarette with lazy, prolonged movements. Singing sounded from below. The blind man was already halfway out on the street; he was singing, meanwhile turning around.”

 

Iván Mándy (23 december 1918 – 26 oktober 1995)

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Iván Mándy, J.J.L. ten Kate, Christa Winsloe, Albert Ehrenstein, Harry Shearer”

Robert Bly, Norman Maclean, Marcelin Pleynet, Tim Fountain, Iván Mándy

De Amerikaanse dichter en schrijver Robert Bly werd geboren op 23 december 1926 in Madison, Minnesota. Zie ook mijn blog van 23 december 2008 en ook mijn blog van 23 december 2009 en ook mijn blog van 23 december 2010.

The Buried Train

Tell me about the train that people say got buried
By the avalanche–was it snow?–It was
In Colorado, and no one saw it happen.
There was smoke from the engine curling up

Lightly through fir tops, and the engine sounds.
There were all those people reading–some
From Thoreau, some from Henry Ward Beecher.
And the engineer smoking and putting his head out.

I wonder when that happened. Was it after
High School, or was it the year we were two?
We entered this narrow place, and we heard the sound
Above us–the train couldn’t move fast enough.

It isn’t clear what happened next. Are you and I
Still sitting there in the train, waiting for the lights
To go on? Or did the real train get really buried;
So at night a ghost train comes out and keeps going…

 

SOLITUDE LATE AT NIGHT IN THE WOODS

I
The body is like a November birch facing the full moon
And reaching into the cold heavens.
In these trees there is no ambition, no sodden body, no leaves,
Nothing but bare trunks climbing like cold fire!

II
My last walk in the trees has come. At dawn
I must return to the trapped fields,
To the obedient earth.
The trees shall be reaching all the winter.

III
It is a joy to walk in the bare woods.
The moonlight is not broken by the heavy leaves.
The leaves are down, and touching the soaked earth,
Giving off the odor that partridges love.

Robert Bly (Madison, 23 december 1926)

Een jonge Robert Bly

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Robert Bly, Norman Maclean, Marcelin Pleynet, Tim Fountain, Iván Mándy”