Richard Blanco, Elke Heidenreich, Chrystine Brouillet, Hans Kruppa, Douglas Hofstadter, Wilhelm Jensen, Demetrius Vikelas

De Amerikaanse dichter Richard Blanco werd geboren op 15 februari 1968 in Madrid. Zie ook alle tags voor Richard Blanco op dit blog.

Mother Picking Produce

She scratches the oranges then smells the peel,
presses an avocado just enough to judge its ripeness,
polishes the Macintoshes searching for bruises.

She selects with hands that have thickened, fingers
that have swollen with history around the white gold
of a wedding ring she now wears as a widow.

Unlike the archived photos of young, slender digits
captive around black and white orange blossoms,
her spotted hands now reaching into the colors.

I see all the folklore of her childhood, the fields,
the fruit she once picked from the very tree,
the wiry roots she pulled out of the very ground.

And now, among the collapsed boxes of yucca,
through crumbling pyramids of golden mangos,
she moves with the same instinct and skill.

This is how she survives death and her son,
on these humble duties that will never change,
on those habits of living which keep a life a life.

She holds up red grapes to ask me what I think,
and what I think is this, a new poem about her-
the grapes look like dusty rubies in her hands,

what I say is this: they look sweet, very sweet.

 

Contemplations at the Virgin de la Caridad Cafetería, Inc.

Que será, el café of this holy, incorporated place,
the wild steam of scorched espresso cakes rising
like mirages from the aromatic waste, waving
over the coffee-glossed lips of these faces

assembled for a standing breakfast of nostalgia,
of tastes that swirl with the delicacy of memories
in these forty-cent cups of brown sugar histories,
in the swirling froth of café-con-leche, que será,

what have they seen that they cannot forget—
the broad-leaf waves of tabaco and plaintains
the clay dust of red and nameless mountains,
que será, that this morning I too am a speck;

I am the brilliant guitar of a tropical morning
speaking Spanish and ribboning through potions
of waist-high steam and green cane oceans,
que será, drums vanishing and returning,

the African gods that rule a rhythmic land
playing their music: bongó, bembé, conga;
que será, that cast the spells of this rumba,
this wild birthright, this tropical dance

with the palms of this exotic confusion;
que será, that I too should be a question,
que será, what have I seen, what do I know—
culture of café and loss, this place I call home.


Richard Blanco (Madrid, 15 februari 1968)

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Richard Blanco, Elke Heidenreich, Chrystine Brouillet, Hans Kruppa, Douglas Hofstadter, Wilhelm Jensen, Demetrius Vikelas”

Stacie Cassarino

De Amerkiaanse dichteres en schrijfster Stacie Cassarino werd geboren op 15 februari 1975 in Hartford, Connecticut. Zij studeerde aan Middlebury College (BA, 1997), aan de Universiteit van Washington (MA, 2000) en UCLA (PhD, 2014). Cassarino doceerde aan de faculteiten Engels van Middlebury College in Vermont, het Pratt Institute in Brooklyn en UCLA. Ze heeft ook als privé chef-kok gewerkt en in Babbo in New York City gekookt. Zij werkt als copy editor op ELLE.com. Haar poëzie werd gepubliceerd in belangrijke literaire tijdschriften zoals The New Republic, Verse Daily, Gulf Coast, Crazyhorse, Iowa Review, Georgia Review, AGNI en de Comstock Review. Haar gedicht “Summer Solstice” kreeg prominente aandacht op de radio in Garrison Keillor’s The Writers ‘Almanac in 2011. In 2005 won ze de “Discovery” / De Joan Leiman Jacobson Poetry Award, in 2007 werd zij genomineerd voor de Rona Jaffe Writer Award en zij werd twee keer genomineerd voor de Pushcart-prijs. Zij heeft ook een grote prijs ontvangen van het Astraea Foundation Writer’s Fund. Haar dichtbundel “Zero at the Bone” werd in 2009 gepubliceerd. Daarvoor kreeg zij in 2010 de Lambda Literary Award en de Audre Lorde Award.

Firework

The day my body caught fire
the woodland darkened. The horizon
was a sea of maids, rushing to piece me
back into a girl. Out of the girl came yellow
flowers, came stem & sepal.
You never happened, they said.
The meadow was a narration of lessness.
Inside the corral, horses fell
from the impact of lightning. They broke
down. I heard gunshots in my sleep.
I was a keeper of breath,
of hay. I walked a field, collecting bones.
You can build a house out of bones.
You can stand at the doorway
quarrelling with your legs to enter
or run until you turn to ash.

 

Snowshoe to Otter Creek

love lasts by not lasting
—Jack Gilbert

I’m mapping this new year’s vanishings:
lover, yellow house, the knowledge of surfaces.
This is not a story of return.
There are times I wish I could erase
the mind’s lucidity, the difficulty of Sundays,
my fervor to be touched
by a woman two Februarys gone. What brings the body
back, grieved and cloven, tromping these woods
with nothing to confide in? New snow reassumes
the circleting trees, the bridge above the creek
where I stand like a stranger to my life.
There is no single moment of loss, there is
an amassing. The disbeliever sleeps at an angle
in the bed. The orchard is a graveyard.
Is this the real end? Someone shoveling her way out
with cold intention? Someone naming her missing?

 
Stacie Cassarino (Hartford, 15 februari 1975)