Cees Nooteboom, Grand Corps Malade, Joanne Rowling, Primo Levi

 

De Nederlandse dichter en schrijver Cees Nooteboom werd geboren in Den Haag op 31 juli 1933. Zie ook alle tags voor Cees Nooteboom op dit blog.

 

Uit: Roads to Santiago (Vertaald door Ina Rilke)

 

„Spain is brutish, anarchic, egocentric, cruel. Spain is prepared to face disaster on a whim, she is chaotic, dreamy, irrational. Spain conquered the world and then did not know what to do with it, she harks back to her Medieval, Arab, Jewish and Christian past and sits there impassively like a continent that is appended to Europe and yet is not Europe, with her obdurate towns studding those limitless empty landscapes. Those who know only the beaten track do not know Spain. Those who have not roamed the labyrinthine complexity of her history do not know what they are travelling through. It is the love of a lifetime, the amazement is never-ending.

From the ship’s rail I watch the dusk settle over the island where I have spent the summer. The approaching night steals into the hills, everything darkens; one by one the tall neon street-lamps come on to illuminate the quay with that dead white glow which is as much a part of the Mediterranean night as the moon. Arrival and departure. For years now I have been crossing to and fro between the Spanish mainland and the islands. The white ships are somewhat bigger than they used to be, but the ritual is unchanged. The quay full of white-uniformed sailors, kinsfolk and lovers come to wave goodbye, the deck crowded with departing holiday-makers, soldiers, children, grandmothers. The gangplank has already been raised, the ship’s whistle will give one final farewell that will resound across the harbour and the city will echo the sound: the same, but weaker. Between the high deck and the quay below a last tenuous link, rolls of toilet paper. The beginnings flutter on the quay; up at the rail, the rolls will unwind slowly as the ship moves away, until the final, most fragile link with those staying behind is broken and the diaphanous paper garlands drown in the black water.

There is still some shouting, cries wafting back, but it is already impossible to tell who is calling out and what their messages signify. We sail out through the long narrow harbour, past the lighthouse and the last buoy — and then the island becomes a dusky shadow within the shadow that is night itself. There is no going back now, we belong to the ship. Guitars and clapping on the afterdeck, people are singing, drinking, the deck passengers are settling down for a long night in their steamer chairs, the dinner bell rings, white-jacketed waiters cross and recross the antique dining room under the earnest regard of the king of Spain.“

 

 

Cees Nooteboom (Den Haag, 31 juli 1933)

Santiago de Compostella

Doorgaan met het lezen van “Cees Nooteboom, Grand Corps Malade, Joanne Rowling, Primo Levi”

In Memoriam Maeve Binchy

 

In Memoriam Maeve Binchy

 

 

De Ierse schrijfster en columniste Meave Binchy is gisteren op 72-jarige leeftijd overleden.Maeve Binchy werd geboren op 28 mei 1940 in Dalkey. Zie ook alle tags voor Maeve Binchy op dit blog.

 

Uit: Circle of Friends

 

“Annabel Hogan came in carrying three big bags. She was surprised to see her daughter sitting swinging her legs in the kitchen.

“Aren’t you home nice and early? Let me put these things upstairs.”

Benny ran over to Patsy when her mother’s heavy tread was heard on the stairs.

“Do you think she got it?”

“Don’t ask me Benny, I know nothing.”

“You’re saying that because you do know.”

“I don’t. Really.”

“Was she in Dublin? Did she go up on the bus?”

“No, not at all.”

“But she must have.” Benny seemed very disappointed.

“No, she’s not long gone at all. . . . She was only up the town.”

Benny licked the spoon thoughtfully. “It’s nicer raw,” she said.

“You always thought that.” Patsy looked at her fondly.

“When I’m eighteen and can do what I like, I’ll eat all my cakes uncooked,” Benny pronounced.

“No you won’t, when you’re eighteen you’ll be so busy getting thin you won’t eat cakes at all.”

“I’ll always want cakes.”

“You say that now. Wait till you want some fellow to fancy you.”

“Do you want a fellow to fancy you?”

“Of course I do, what else is there?”

“What fellow? I don’t want you to go anyway.”

“I won’t get a fellow, I’m from nowhere, a decent fellow wouldn’t be able to talk about me and where I came from. I have no background, no life before, you see.”

“But you had a great life,” Benny cried. “You’d make them all interested in you.”

 

 

Maeve Binchy (28 mei 1940 – 30 juli 2012)