E. E. Cummings, Péter Nádas, Katha Pollitt, Daniël Rovers

De Amerikaanse dichter en schrijver Edward Estlin Cummings werd geboren in Cambridge, Massachusetts op 14 oktober 1894. Zie ook mijn blog van 14 oktober 2008 en ook mijn blog van 14 oktober 2009 en ook mijn blog van 14 oktober 2010.

 

“Gay” is the captivating cognomen

“Gay” is the captivating cognomen of a Young Woman of cambridge,

mass.

to whom nobody seems to have mentioned ye olde freudian wish;

when i contemplate her uneyes safely ensconced in thick glass

you try if we are a gentleman not to think of(sh)

the world renowned investigator of paper sailors–argonauta argo

harmoniously being with his probably most brilliant pupil mated,

let us not deem it miraculous if their(so to speak)offspring has that largo

appearance of somebody who was hectocotyliferously propagated

when Miss G touched n.y. our skeleton stepped from his cupboard

gallantly offering to demonstrate the biggest best busiest city

and presently found himself rattling for that well known suburb

the bronx(enlivening an otherwise dead silence with harmless quips, out

of Briggs by Kitty)

arriving in an exhausted condition, i purchased two bags of lukewarm

peanuts

with the dime which her mama had generously provided(despite courte-

ous protestations)

and offering Miss Gay one(which she politely refused)set out gaily for

the hyenas

suppressing my frank qualms in deference to her not inobvious perturba-

tions

unhappily, the denizens of the zoo were that day inclined to be uncouthly

erotic

more particularly the primates–from which with dignity square feet

turned abruptly Miss Gay away:

“on the whole”(if you will permit a metaphor savouring slightly of the

demotic)

Miss Gay had nothing to say to the animals and the animals had nothing

to say to Miss Gay

during our return voyage, my pensive companion dimly remarlted some-

thing about “stuffed

fauna” being “very interesting” . . . we also discussed the possibility of

rain. . .

E distant proximity to a Y.W.c.a. she suddenly luffed

–thanking me; and(stating that she hoped we might “meet again

sometime”)vanished, gunwale awash. I thereupon loosened my collar

and dove for the nearest l; surreptitiously cogitating

the dictum of a new england sculptor(well on in life)re the helen moller

dancers, whom he considered “elevating–that is, if dancing CAN be ele-

vating”

Miss(believe it or)Gay is a certain Young Woman unacquainted with the

libido

and pursuing a course of instruction at radcliffe college, cambridge, mass.

i try if you are a gentleman not to sense something un poco putrido

when we contemplate her uneyes safely ensconced in thick glass

 


E. E. Cummings (14 oktober 1894 – 3 september 1962)

Portret doorJohn Bedford

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Katherine Mansfield, Margarete Susman, Stefan Żeromski

De Nieuw-Zeelandse schrijfster Katherine Mansfield werd geboren op 14 oktober 1888 in Wellington. Zie ook mijn blog van 14 oktober 2010 en eveneens alle tags voor Katherine Mansfield op dit blog.

 

Uit: The Storyteller (Biografie door Kathleen Jones)

„The first thing you notice in Wellington is the wind. A full southerly buster was blowing as I drove in around the bays of the harbour, hurling the waves onto the rocks. At the hotel on Tinakori Road, shutters slapped and banged in a crazy percussion, just as Katherine described in one of her earliest stories, ‘The Wind Blows’. I recognised the way it blew the stinging dust in waves, in clouds, in big round whirls, heard the ‘loud roaring sound’ from the tree ferns and the pohutukawa trees in the botanic garden, the clanking of the overhead cables for the trolley buses. Clinging to the car door to steady myself, the street map levitating from my grasp, I experienced the exactness of Katherine’s images – ‘a newspaper wagged in the air like a lost kite’ before spiking itself onto a pine tree; sentences blew away ‘like little narrow ribbons’.

Tinakori Road, where Katherine was born and where her father occupied progressively larger houses as his status rose, runs along a steep hillside with spectacular views of the city. Above it, a tree- clad slope climbs upwards towards the ridge and below it, houses stagger downhill towards the brief fringe of level ground that edges the circular bay, enclosed by hills. The street follows a major fault line in an area that remains seismically active, and tremors were part of Katherine’s childhood experience.

Katherine loved the view from Tinakori Road, writing in her youthful notebook how ‘all in a fever myself I rushed out of the stifling house . . . on to the gorse golden hills. A white road round the hills – there I walked. And below me, like a beautiful Pre- Raphaelite picture, lay the sea and the violet mountains. The sky all a riot of rose and yellow – amethyst and purple. At the foot of the hill – the city – but all curtained by a blue mist that hung over it in pale wreaths of Beauty. Though engulfed by the expanding capital, the old houses renumbered to accommodate the new, Tinakori Road has changed little in a hundred and twenty years. It is still lined by brightly painted wooden houses, and you can have a drink in the local working men’s pub, where Katherine’s inscrutable face looks down from the wall.“

 

Katherine Mansfield (14 oktober 1888 – 9 januari 1923)

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